Mike Stimpson

I have a great love of film, especially those from the early part of the 20th century, which came out of Europe, especially those classed as German expressionism. My initial thoughts were how to present this in an interesting way and also have a concept behind it, which would be sustainable for a book project. 

I am an avid collector of vintage/retro toys especially Lego.

Mike Stimpson
 

Mike Stimpson is a photographer who specialises in recreating iconic images in Lego

The Kiss VE Day

Tennis Girl

Lunch atop a Skyscraper 

These images stem from the artist's love of Lego and his interest in research and the history of photography. Beyond that, they can be seen as a comment on the owner and authorship of an image. Similar with Sharon Core's work as previously discussed we question these images, are they copies of the original, such as a forger etc may do to display or sell claiming they are the original? or in this case can it be thought of as a homage to the original? given the nature of the images, it is clear that they probably fall into the latter, no one could mistake these for the original images due to the very nature of the toys used to recreate them.
It is also interesting to think of the types of images he is recreating. Lego is a bright, fun, childs toy, the original works display images of times which were very dark, such as end of the second world war in the Kiss, and the great Depression in Lunch atop a skyscraper, or as in the Tennis Girl, a slightly sexual image, from the 70s a time when people were becoming more open about their sexuallity. So to use this brightly coloured fun to, to represent those harrowing periods and the idea of a childs innocent toy, to recreate an image, during a time of increased sexuality, is an interesting juxtaposition.
 

I decided to try this myself using films, which depict horror or harrowing scenes, such as the Phantoms unmasking in the Lon chaney Silent version of the phantom of the opera or the Odessa Steps sequence in the Battleship Potempkin

After group feedback and technical limitations I decided that i may have to try and find a different route.
One of the drawbacks i noted during the feedback sessions was people may not know the actual films that well if at all. This was highlighted when my peers couldnt identify the films, from my recreations (though our tutor Gavin did) So I am guessing this may be down to differences in our ages, or just different interests. Also in the studio it was difficult to get the lighting correct, even with the snoot head in place the images were softly illuminated due to their small size, that along with attempting to get the composition correct, and the close distance I had to work, made getting a corect depth of field problamatic.